Australian dressmaker dies aged 73

July 18, 2021 0 Comments

Victorian dressmaker George “George” Woodcock, who was credited with pioneering the use of silk in Australian dressmaking, died on Tuesday in Perth.

Mr Woodcock died of natural causes at his home, where he had been for the past two decades.

Mr Woodscock’s daughter, Linda Woodcock said her father had died at home on Tuesday morning.

“He was a very proud man, very proud of his work and his family,” she said.

“I think he loved his family.”

Mr Woodruff had been credited with leading the country’s first silk-baking factory in Victorian townships, and in the late 1930s became the world’s first dressmaker to produce a high-quality, durable, and long-lasting garment made of woven silk.

“It was a real honour to be able to create such beautiful garments for the Australian people, and George’s creations were a great inspiration,” Mr Woodridge said.

Mr Macrae, who died in December aged 95, made an impact on Australian culture through his work.

He made the silk from the coconuts and peaches of Tasmania, and also used it to make his silk dresses and moccasins.

“George was a pioneer of the silk-making process, and he had a very close personal connection to Tasmania, the place he grew up in,” Ms Woodcock added.

Ms Woodridge, who worked with Mr Woodcocks father at the factory, said her dad would often come to her parents home to make a speech. “

We will miss him dearly.”

Ms Woodridge, who worked with Mr Woodcocks father at the factory, said her dad would often come to her parents home to make a speech.

“When he would speak to his family, he would say to his mother, ‘You’re not going to believe this, but it’s true,'” she said, laughing.

He had a real passion for his craft.” “

His life was full of such great inspiration.

He had a real passion for his craft.”

In recent years, the Victorian Government has worked to introduce more regulation around the manufacture of the production of silk, in order to better protect it from being contaminated with the fungus.

“There’s a lot of work that has gone on in recent years in the Victorian government, to make sure we are not going back to the dark ages of the 19th century,” Ms Macraes father, a textile and apparel executive, said.

He said he would like to see more regulation introduced to protect the production and sale of the material, and said he hoped it would be a priority in the coming years.

The Victorian government said in its first-ever budget this year that it was reviewing the current legislation and regulation surrounding the production, sale and trade of the natural fibre.

“The Government has made a decision to review the regulation around natural fibre manufacture, which has resulted in some significant reforms,” the state government said.